How I feel: Pride

How I feel: Pride

Of course it is fine to have such sentiments. . . However, since I don’t really believe in Gay Pride either, I am simply posting this to make a discussion point. Wouldn’t it be better if we all just accepted the fact that we are human, and instead of having pride in divisive points, have pride that our communities work, and that we treat our fellow man with respect?

No, I suppose not, because our pride gets in the way of either of these being true, whether that pride be gay or straight.

Pride is what keeps us from seeing reality.

The Gay Liberation of Straight Men

Original article here.

I’ve discovered that NOM’s new official expert, Anthony Esolen, is so wrong about so many things that you can gain insight just by contemplating the opposite of what he says.

Back in 2006, Anthony offered 10 non-religious reasons for opposing same-sex marriage. Here’s #5:

It will curtail opportunities for deep and emotionally fulfilling friendships between members of the same sex, opportunities that are already few and strained. This is particularly true of men.

This was a disastrous prediction. It’s not just not that his reasoning is convoluted, but that events have proved him laughably wrong.

It’s always tough to summarize Anthony’s arguments. He never uses one word when twenty will do, and he’s never seen a paragraph he couldn’t improve by stretching it with flowery repetition. Here, though, is the meat:

…now the condonement of homosexuality prevents [boys] from publicly preferring the company of their own sex. This is simply inarguable. If a George Gershwin nowadays shows up at Maxie Rosenzweig’s house all the time, while his pals are outside on the streets playing stickball, then there must be something up with George and Maxie.

And then, apparently without realizing it, Anthony proceeds to refute himself:

Therefore unless they are comfortable with the meaning, they will shy away from one another.

Exactly. Really, I wish I could put my hands on Anthony’s shoulders, look him deep in the eye, and say, “Exactly. The problem arises not when homosexuality is condoned, but when it iscondemned.”

For instance: I’m not straight, left-handed, or Canadian. But rumors to the contrary wouldn’t freak me out, because I see nothing wrong with those traits, and neither does the society in which I travel.

However, if I lived in a world where I could be shunned, disowned, fired, or lobotomized just for being left-handed…then, yeah, I might be more worried about people thinking I’m a left-handed deviant monster, and might work harder to squelch those rumors.

Fast forward to 2013. Same-sex marriage is legal in much of the country; we’ve had 7-years of non-stop national conversation about gays and lesbians; and a new generation has matured thinking, What’s the big friggin’ deal.

blake adamThe result? A culture where people talk freely of man crushes and bromance. A culture in which one of the most popular TV shows is practically built around the friendship and spicy, flirtatious chemistry between two of its handsome and avowedly heterosexual stars.

Granted, this pop culture phenomenon isn’t on the same plane as the friendships Anthony pines for — David and Jonathan, Enkidu and Gilgamesh, John the Baptist and Jesus Christ (!) — but the fact that cannot be denied (the thing that is “simply inarguable”) is that men are freer to delight in each other than at any time in recent memory. And Anthony Esolen, god bless him, may misunderstand it completely but has pointed out the reason for this liberation: Straight men find it easier to create intimate, loving friendships when they have no reason to give a damn whether people think they’re gay.

The Things We Thought We Knew.

I hate the word homophobia. It’s not a phobia. You are not scared. You are an asshole.
-Morgan Freeman

Or was it? I have actually just found out that this quote isn’t actually something Morgan Freeman said at all, which saddened me because I really like the quote, and attributing it to my favorite actor made me happy.

But it doesn’t matter much to me that he didn’t say it, not in the long run, because ultimately Morgan Freeman still supports marriage equality, as evidenced by the fact that he lent his voice to this ad. That, in and of itself keeps him in a great spot with me.

Kudos to Morgan Freeman.